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Frequently Asked Questions - General

What is a 'hybrid' energy system, and what advantages do they have?

What is “distributed generation” ?

Can I just ‘plug’ a wind turbine or PhotoVoltaic cell into my building and use the electricity ?

Is it true that Distributed Generation facilities have a negative effect on property values?

 

What is a 'hybrid' energy system, and what advantages do they have?

A hybrid energy system usually consists of two or more energy sources used together to provide a better energy supply balance. For example, solar photovoltaic panels can be coupled with wind turbines. During the winter, the wind turbine would be more efficient than solar panels, while during the summer,  solar would be more efficient. Hybrid systems can make more economic sense than wind or solar alone. This technique is referred to as " hardening  the supply".

What is “distributed generation” ?

Distributed Generation simply means that the electricity generated is used near where it is generated.  Even as recently as 50 years ago, most communities in Ontario that had running water nearby also had a ‘microhydro’ generating station to produce their own electricity.  These stations were eventually absorbed into the ‘grid’, and ultimately discontinued.  The Ontario Power Authority has recognized the need for Distributed Generation and is now investigating the building of renewable energy and in some cases even fossil-fuel generating stations in and around communities today.

Today’s commercial and industrial complexes often use as much electricity as a small town ( or sometimes a large one ), and can achieve significant financial and availability benefits by building their own electricity generation facilities on their own premises. A Hybridyne Power System would give that complex the Energy Independence© that true Distributed Generation provides, with the added advantages of freedom from Energy Inflation© and the ‘Green’ benefit of not burning increasingly expensive and environmentally dangerous fossil fuels.

Can I just ‘plug’ a wind turbine or PhotoVoltaic cell into my building and use the electricity ?

Unfortunately, no.  The electricity produced by a wind turbine generator or PhotoVoltaic cell needs to be converted to 60-cycle Alternating Current at the correct voltage before it can be used. Furthermore, you need to be able to store the excess energy so that you have some available when the wind doesn’t blow or it gets dark.  Also, most turbines don’t capture very high-speed or low-speed wind effectively.  The good news is that Hybridyne’s patented Conversion/Inversion Technology (CIT) manages all of these concerns – capturing all of the available energy from its more efficient turbines ,  converting the ‘raw’ power into fully-conditioned power , and storing it efficiently for later use.

   The same is essentially true for PV (photovoltaic) cells, they generate DC (direct current) electricity and are not directly compatible with a home or business (which are all A/C (alternating current) of some voltage or other).  The PV cells need to be installed in such quantity and connected in such a way that the voltage provided is high enough for power electronic “Inverters” to convert the DC to 60 cycle A/C for use in home and industry. Once again, the good news is that Hybridyne’s patented Conversion/Inversion Technology (CIT) manages all of these concerns – capturing all of the available energy and converting the ‘raw’ power into fully-conditioned power, and storing it efficiently for later use.


Is it true that Distributed Generation facilities have a negative effect on property values?

According to surveys of tax assessors in areas with wind power projects, the answer is "No."

A newly released study of 25,000 real estate sales has found no evidence of negative impacts on property values.  In a majority of cases, properties that had a view of wind turbines appreciated in real estate value more quickly than nearby properties that did not have a view of the wind turbines, according to the study. This effect would seem to be related to “pride” in a ‘green’ community that is reducing it's 'carbon footprint'.